Dan Schawbel

Dan Schawbel

Headline Image: Five Steps To Achieving More With Dan Schawbel

 

You’ve probably heard of Dan Schawbel in your circles. He made it onto Forbes 30 under 30 in marketing and advertising, Inc. magazine’s 30 under 30 2010 list, and Business Insider’s Most Innovative People Under 40 list.

 

If you follow him on Instagram, you know his passion and mission in life is to help his generation (Millennials) from student to CEO. He wants to be a resource for Millennials whether they need support building their career, improving their personal lives, or somewhere in between.

 

As a New York Times bestselling author, serial entrepreneur, Fortune 500 consultant, millennial TV personality, global keynote speaker, career and workplace expert and startup advisor, he’s got a lot to say about achieving more in your life.

 

Image: photo of Dan speaking

 

Whatever that might look like for you, here are five ways you can get started today.

 

Find Your Passion

This is a tough one for most of us. But Dan says it’s all about trial and error.

 

Do as much as you can as early in life as possible because that will help you rule out what you’re not passionate about. It will help you discover those things that really excite you and that play to your strengths.

 

If you’ve never done a research project in your life, how do you know if you like or dislike research? If you’ve never held a management or leadership position, how do you know if you can thrive in that position? You can’t write great blog posts if you hate research, and you won’t thrive conducting 45 research studies if learn you don’t like working alone.

 

Try all you do want; that’s the bottom line.

 

And don’t try to live up to someone else’s expectations or try to be someone else because it’s just not sustainable. If you stay true to who you are, you will fall into your passions, and that’s where the true growth and fulfillment lives.  

 

Image quote: The mindset is all about achievement, and the struggle is about fulfillment. -Chad Sanschagrin

 

Grow at Work

This is most important for those in leadership positions; those who build and transform company cultures.

 

On average, companies only spend about $500 per employee on growth and development, and they’re definitely not spending money on socialization. So what happens to that employee who isn’t being challenged to grow?

 

People want fair pay, but beyond that they want a company that values them and shows it. Corporations tend to think short term. They will invest money in technology, but the reality is that it will cost them so much more to replace the employee they’re not investing in.

 

When it comes to what generations value, for 22-35 year olds it’s flexibility, healthcare coverage, and learning and development opportunities. For those 40-60 years old, it’s healthcare coverage and retirement.

 

The secret is treating people like adults. Customize your benefits for what people need during the specific season they’re in because it changes over time. And if your company is already doing this, are you taking advantage of the opportunities? Are you using the professional development budget set aside for you?

 

Build Relationships

We spend a third of our lives working, and yet in a study Dan conducted, he found 7% of the global workforce has zero friends at work, and half have five or fewer.

 

With so much time spent at the office, shouldn’t we have good relationships with the people we’re working with? Shouldn’t we be friends?

 

The truth is, if you have good friends at work, you tend to be more loyal to the company, more productive, and generally happier at work. True happiness comes from the relationships you have. And not to mention, happy workers mean happy customers which means more profit.

 

Image: photo of employees chatting around the water cooler/coffee room

 

Self-Promote

Promoting yourself is not just about promoting yourself within a company, it’s about pushing yourself, your dreams, and your career ambitions forward. Promotion gets a bad name because it sounds like it’s all about the individual.

 

But when it comes to promotion, all you’re really doing is sharing the skills and knowledge you have so that you can better share that with your team. Self promotion is good as long as it’s in service of others, providing value with the intent of sharing knowledge.  

 

But you have to be willing to actually share what you’re promoting because if you don’t then it’s all about you. This may require a lot of practice too. That could mean doing a lot of gigs for free in order to hone in on the skill you want to eventually promote. Even if something seems small and insignificant, it’s a stepping stone.

 

You will be ready when the big opportunity arrives because you’ve practiced in front of 30 people multiple times.

 

Image quote: Small steps before big leaps.- Dan Schawbel

 

You never know what lesson you’re going to learn in each moment; there are so many life lessons in experience. Decisions you make at 22 can still help you when you’re 92.

 

Look For Small Wins

These are so important. Push out as much as you can over a long period of time because you never know who’s going to pick it up and when.

 

Small wins dig you out of big ditches.

 

They enable you to keep going despite speed bumps that slow down your momentum. You have to believe in yourself more than anyone else believes in you, and you have to be up for doing the grunt work. You have to love what you’re doing because the work is too hard not to.

 

Don’t always be concerned about the next thing you’re going to do- a lot of times that is driven by other’s expectations of you. People view successful people as people that have everything together, but that’s rarely the case. So be proud of those small wins and watch how they build upon one another to make something awesome.

 

There’s a reason Dan Schawbel has held such a successful career. He’s lived by these five mantras since day 1. Which will you commit to this week?

 

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